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of the exhibitors at ces international 2013 in las vegas is a company called healthspot and steve cashman is the ceo and founder. mr. cashman what is it that your company makes? >> guest: we make what we call healthspot station and it's delivering the highest quality lowest-cost health care in america. her vision is to create access to health care and consumer pharmacies across the country and empower the health system sent out there's to let you have a bryant experience with health care which is unlike what you have today. >> host: how to use technology to do that? >> guest: that is why the consumer climate -- electronic shows interesting. you see software connectivity all combined in a package wrapped up a little bit too high the technology and focus on an integrated experience so about everything you see walking through the show is a little bit and healthspot. >> host:. >> host: steve cashman he just won an award at the show, correct? >> guest: we are happy to wind the popular science ces 2013 future product of the year so it's an honor and we have worked hard to understand consumers and their ne
2013? las vegas is a company called healthspot. steve cashman is the ceo and founder of healthspot. mr. cashman, what is it that your company makes? >> guest: well, we make what we call a healthspot station, and what that's about is to learn the highest quality, lowest cost health care in america, and our vision is to create access to health care in consumer pharmacies all across the country and empower the health systems and doctors to see you there what it's convenient for you as a consumer and let you have a brilliant experience with health care. >> host: and how do you use technology to do that? >> guest: well, we've encompassed a lot of technology, so that's why the consumer or electronics show is pretty interesting, software connectivity, all combined in a package that's wrapped up apple like to just tie the technology and focus on getting you healthy and have a great experience. so about everything that you see walking through the show there's a little bit of at healthspot. >> host: you just won an award here, correct? >> guest: we did. we're very happy to have won the popular s
recollection is correct, that steve jobs, for example, did not sign that pledge, as did, i think oprah was one of them, didn't sign the pledge -- >> right, and i talked about them in the book. >> then i'll have to read it. [laughter] but what my question, really is is that people -- is the category of good rich only those people who participate in philanthropy, or the good rich also for people for what they do or what they have invented to make our lives better? >> your question is good, and i think your answer is a good one. it is possible to get off the hook, to get off the hook of being rich and make us love you any way even if you aren't philanthropic, and, certainly, steve jobs is an example of doing that. he not only did not give. he scorned giving and said that most people were simply doing it to buff up their reputations, and he was not going to be involved in playing that kind of game. there was a lot of adverse comment during his life about the fact that he was so ungenerous. oprah was different in the sense that she was philanthropic, is philanthropically inclined, but she didn't si
because at steve's the system a lot of time and money rather than going through a trial that's expensive and lasts for days and moves the case so there's a lot of people in the plea bargaining system that benefits from that process. if it's there it's not fair for example if the prosecutor makes a plea bargain with the defendant but doesn't tell the defendant of the evidence against him or doesn't reveal to the defendant that there is exculpatory evidence don't tend to show the defendant is not guilty if the prosecutor suppresses that, doesn't turn it over to the defense that isn't fair. >> is that legal? >> guest: it is not. the of a constitutional obligation to turn over all exculpatory evidence in brady versus maryland it's called brady material he will hear it called. many people remember the duke lacrosse case in north carolina were the prosecutor had this evidence showing that the young men on the team were probably not guilty because none of their dna was found and he suppressed that and ended up getting disbarred in that case which is in and of itself unusual because frequent pro
at the conservative political action conference known as cpac. we'll also hear from congressman steve king of iowa. this is an hour, 15 minutes. >> five to six years ago the national debt was not really a big deal. people didn't even know we had a national debt or deficit. but then a grassroots movement known as the tea party started to emerge. [cheers and applause] and what made the tea party so effective was not only it came from the grassroots, but it had three core values; fiscal responsibility, constitutionally-limited government and free markets. and because of the tea party, we were able to put patriots like michele bachmann, joe walsh into congress so they can make sure that congress will not continue to spend my generation's money. [applause] we need to save the tea party so that we can save america. [applause] ladies and gentlemen, please welcome jenny martin from the tea party patriots. [cheers and applause] ♪ >> thank you. [cheers and applause] picture this: college students in this country who are optimistic about the future and look forward to living the american dream. after colle
all millennials who were there at occupy wall street celebrating a life of steve jobs which took place -- is death to place at the same moment that was going on and it was his great way of showing that millennials believe that corporations are part of our world while they can set standards and say we disagree with the financial practices but still celebrate in the court -- great leader and innovator in thinker and being able to hold both of those beliefs of the same time i think is one of the hallmarks of this generation. we don't like these practices but we celebrate the great things that american business and american leaders can do. >> host: i think a lot of people will remember looking back on occupy wall street there were a lot of news clips of someone putting a microphone and a camera and a young person's face and asking why you were here and young people not been able to define the point. and actually that might have been by design and that might have been a success of the summa work out of 50's and the movements ,-com,-com ma successful mass movements are fake and they are undi
the whole going from rick, the bureau chief, on to rich, who covered the national security council, steve roberts, and marty schulte who were alternating congress and white house, bernie, the foreign diplomatic correspondent, and they weave in and out. i'll do a long one of marty. primarily because it tells what it was like there without exception if you started in the new york times at that time. marty said, got a bachelor of law degree and then i went into the service for two years and came out and took a v.a. course called, how to get a job. the burden of which was something to do -- go for had gone you're interested. and i wrote 110 makes and i was offered copy boy jobs, mailroom jobs. took the one at the new york times. when you got that job, according to the v.a. course, consider at it food in the door and make yourself useful to the people doing the work you've whatnot to do, and some day a task will come and somebody will be on a project or on vacation or sick and they'll look at you and say, what the heck, he knows how to bring us coffee, how to rip copy of off the machine. give
solicitor general and steve gillis, one of his former law clerks and they help shepherd through this process. neither of them that the well either and i think they and he made a terrible strategic mistake -- to strategic mistakes. first they made a strategic mistake and believing these hearings have any intellectual con tent. [laughter] seven senators asked him questions and he took them seriously but they had no intellectual content. the senators serge knew what he thought. he left a huge trip record. the correct way to proceed with this political theater. this is something his hearings taught everybody send a note hearing since bork to and handled anything like it. the second error he committed is related to the first. 50 to assess and intellectual exchange, is that the senators earlier entries in the substance, he responded with utmost gravity and not with levity. as i said, bob trent great is the funniest men i've ever met. the only person close as justice ginsburg's has been. he was quicker than anybody seen. most of the questions deserved what it your body should have done this produce
saw millenials who were there at "occupy wall street," celebrating the life of steve jobs, which took place -- his death took place at the same moment that was going on. and it was this great way of showing they we that millenials believe that corporations are part of our world, while they can stand and say we disagree with the financial practices, we can still celebrate a great corporate titan and leader and innovator and thinker, and being able to hold both beliefs at the same time is one of the hallmarks of this generation, we can hold in our head, we don't like these approximates but we celebrate the great things that american business and american leaders can do. >> host: a lot of people will remember looking back on "occupy wall street," a lot of news clips of someone putting the microphone and a camera in a young person's face and asking why you're here, and young people not really being able to define the point. and actually, that might have been by design, and that might have been a success -- a mark of success. eric hopper writes in true believer, the nature of mass movemen
a column. i discussed this once with the actor and entertainer steve allen, who has so many gifts, and i said, "you know, does it ever amuse you that people compliment you for your gift, as if you had lined up when they were being passed out and took one from here and one from there?" and it did, and it does me as well. i don't know how i do it. i don't know how ideas come to me, they just do. it's just a gift. i'm grateful to have it. >> do you write fast? >> sometimes. sometimes it takes-- it depends on the subject, and it depends on the story. sometimes i'll have to go look up some information or do a little research or get somebody to do it for me, and that will take a little while. but generally, i start with a certain series of ideas and ideals, a certain philosophical base. i'm not looking for a deliverer, for example, from any government agency or for the congress. there's no doubt in my mind as to why we have cultural collapse. as lincoln said, "we've forgotten god, that's why all this has happened." so that gives me, in my judgment, kind of a step up on others who are still loo
up, congressman steve pierce of new mexico discusses the republican outreach strategy, a day after rnc chairman announced party policy changes. >> next, two former middle east advisers to the white house discuss the implications of president obama's trip to the middle east next week. from washington institute, this is about 90 minutes. >> good afternoon. good afternoon. welcome to the washington institute. i'm rob the director of the inconstitute. i'm happy to welcome you here today. just at the outset, if i can please remind you, cell phones off, please, not just on vibrate but off completely. this event is being live-streamed for our thousands of fans around the world. this event is being broadcast by c-span, so, everything you say can and will be used against you. so, please too turn your cell phones off. we're gathered here today because president obama is off for the inaugural overseas visit of his second term and he is going to the middle east. going to israel, to the west bank, and to jordan. his itinerary is a very different than the itinerary of his middle east trip in the
know, steve jobs with others inventing apple in his garage, and you don't want to be imposing burdens on that kind of creativity. so what the bureau has been spending quite a bit of time on and certainly has as a top priority this year is coming up with a proposal with other members of the intelligence community that tries to balance all of that but does tackle the problem of trying to modernize where we were from 1994 given how much technology has advanced. and let me just quickly then turn to cyber. so as all of you, i think, who have followed many speeches by the head of nsa, but certainly by the directer of the fbi and many others, the add event of sign -- advent of cyber crime is really here to stay. it is now possible to commit crimes in seconds that really would have taken, you know, years of planning to do in the sort of real physical 3-d world. you could have critical infrastructure crimes, financial network crimes, you can have, of course, huge intellectual property crime, and the tool is people can write scripts that is used to be sort of the safecracker of olden days. let
management technique is the same and steve thought the same thing and it takes time to put your team together and you never get it just right and i think we got it pretty close to just write. kicking shows and he will get grief and there will be. >> we have the same thing of news, and sports and movies. "les mis", ted, a battleship, we have good ones and not good ones but that is the nature of the content business and it needs to be more even and not go so high or so ago but would get the people. are they making the best decisions? the thing that we found, it just wasn't right for ge to make pilots hoping to find the next hit. they could build power plants or energy so all parts of the company were getting less capital, less investment, less attention and to but we told our investors we have a balance sheet to invest so we have bet more money the of reid doubled capital to get this be offset requires more bandwidth and we're trying to but in the case of nbc universal i have never seen another company that has more opportunities. of it is all about the right to people and they decided it is th
'm steve pearce, i represent the 2nd district of new mexico, 34% republican, 52% hispanic, and they're hungry for the conservative values that we represent. you heard susan describe atlas, and the question for us today is has atlas shrugged? now, to have a significant discussion about that we first of all need to think about the two terms potential and kinetic energy. you all know what potential is. we have all seen these kids at school that excel in athletics or maybe in the classroom, and we hope they live up to their potential. actually, washington, d.c., the redskins are home to one of the stories of potential versus kinetic energy. a kid that grew up in my hometown, timmy smith. we watched as he electrified audiences with his running ability in football through junior high and high school, actually came here to play professional football, and in his rookie year had an outstanding year, culminated in the super bowl by setting a record, the all-time record for rushing in the superpole by a rookie from my hometown. he demonstrated potential his whole life, and yet he went home two
butting tries. there's an story of steve jobs and the others iran venting -- inventing apple in the garage and you don't want to be imposing burdens on the creativity. with the bureau has been spending quite a bit of time on and certainly has a top piratety this year -- priority this year is coming up with a proposal with the other members of the intelligence community that tries to balance all of that, but does tackle the problem of trying to modernize where we were from 1994 given how much technology has advanced. and let me just quickly turn to cyber. so all of you, i think you followed many speeches by director of the fbi, and many others. thed a vice president -- advent of cyber crime is really here to stay. it's possible to commit crimes in seconds that really would have taken, you know, years of planning do in the sort of real physical 3-d world. you can have critical infrastructure crimes, financial networking crimes, you have intellectual property crimes. and the tool is people write scripts that used to be sort of the same cracker of olden dais. let me just address some of the ch
works on a state level and apply it nationally. for example, when a conservative like steve pearce in new mexico wins in a predominantly latino district, we need to glean the lessons of his approach. second, in order to combat misperceptions, we will premiere an aggressive marketing campaign across the country, especially in communities we haven't been in a long time about what it means to be a republican. third, we're going to establish regular focus groups and listening sessions to insure we're on target in these communities. we will regularly share our findings as well as polling results with our candidates, allies, state parties and elected officials. because it all goes back to what our moms used to tell us. it's not just what you say, it's how we say it. the promise of opportunity will be our message, and a spirit of optimism will infuse everything that we do. messaging certainly overlaps with the next action area, demographic partners. now, i didn't need the report to tell me that we have to do, we have to do a lot better job and do a lot more to make up ground in minority c
management technique is, it's all about people. it i think steve burke believes the same thing. it takes time to put your team together. you never did it just right, and you always are making some changes, but i think we have it pretty close to just right now. a super person taking shows. he is going to use grief when it fails and praised when it succeeds in there will be more of that attention going. we have the same thing in news, the same thing in sports, the same thing in movies. we had coming you know, but ted, some really good ones, some not so good ones, but that is the nature of the content business. for me personally you have to try to be more even than not go so high and go solo and try to continue to look at the people. really good at making the best decisions? you giving them the tools connect the thing that we found, and this is -- a wonderful partner. it just wasn't right any more to go make pilots hoping to find an exit. they could build power plants somewhere else or energy. and so all parts of the company were getting less capital and less investment and less attention and i
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17